Malawi

“Better Safe Than Sorry”: TB CARE II Malawi Promotes Active TB Screening among HIV-Positive Teachers and Learners

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In an effort to improve TB/HIV integration in the country, TB CARE II Malawi is collaborating with the Ministries of Health and Education to increase TB screening among HIV-positive school teachers and learners.   Working under the motto, “Better Safe than Sorry”, the campaign is encouraging HIV positive individuals to be screened routinely for TB – in order to identify and treat the disease early, rather than risk waiting to develop advanced TB disease. TB CARE II held sensitization and awareness sessions in Balaka, Machinga, and Ntcheu districts earlier this year.

Promoting Integrated TB/HIV Services Through One-Stop-Shop Model in Malawi

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Malawi has an HIV prevalence rate of 10.3% and a TB incidence rate of 163 per 100,000. Nearly 60% of TB patients are co-infected with HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV-positive TB patients have worse treatment outcomes than HIV-negative TB patients, and TB-related mortality among TB/HIV co-infected patients is particularly high during the first two to three months of TB treatment. Early initiation of ART during TB treatment has been shown to improve survival. Despite high levels of TB/HIV

URC Participates in the 44th World Conference on Lung Health

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URC will again have a significant presence at this year’s Union World Conference on Lung Health from October 30–November 3 in Paris, France. In many of the 22 countries that account for more than 80% of TB cases worldwide, we are supporting national TB programs through innovative approaches to address systemic barriers to effective prevention and treatment. The conference provides an opportunity to share our TB work with thousands of health care professionals, researchers, and advocates.

Below is a list of our activities. We look forward to seeing you there or interacting with you on Twitter @urcchs using #LungHealth

- See more at: http://www.urc-chs.com/recent/news?newsItemID=374#sthash.9tWg43fj.dpuf

URC will again have a significant presence at this year’s Union World Conference on Lung Health from October 30–November 3 in Paris, France. In many of the 22 countries that account for more than 80% of TB cases worldwide, we are supporting national TB programs through innovative approaches to address systemic barriers to effective prevention and treatment. The conference provides an opportunity to share our TB work with thousands of health care professionals, researchers, and advocates.

Information and resources from URC’s TB projects in South Africa, Swaziland, Georgia, Malawi, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and Cambodia will be on display, along with URC’s global TB CARE II project at the URC booth. 

Please see attached newsletter or visit the URC web page at http://www.urc-chs.com/recent/news?newsItemID=374 for more information.

 

TB CARE II Project Overview

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The USAID TB CARE II Project, a five-year project implemented by a wide consortium of health and development organizations including and led by University Research Co., LLC (URC), began in 2010 with the aim of complementing and building upon existing and planned projects in the Bureau for Global Health to provide global leadership and support to National TB Programs and other in-country partners. Since then, the project team has grown as a key global resource for the development of innovative tools and approaches to combat TB, multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB, and TB/HIV.

TB CARE II Malawi: Infographic

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Malawi is a low income country with a population of about 15 million.  TB remains a major public health problem in the country.  According to the WHO World TB Report 2012, there were an estimated 29,000 new cases of TB (all forms) in the year 2011, and approximately 18,000 of these were HIV positive. The HIV pandemic presents a significant challenge to global TB control. The USAID TB CARE II Malawi project, launched in 2010, is a 5 year coordinated effort led by URC in collaboration with Project HOPE and PIH. The project assists the National TB Program in improving TB control and expanding access to high quality TB and TB/HIV services in the public sector.  The project recently developed infographics designed to highlight project successes spanning the past 21 months. 

 

Country Program: 

Malawi

Malawi is a land-locked country located in Southern-Central Africa, sharing borders with Tanzania, Zambia, and Mozambique. It has a land area of about 118,484 km2, with a projected population of about 16.4 million. The country is divided into three geographical regions (north, central, and south). There are 28 districts organized into five health zones (Northern Zone, Central Eastern Zone, Central Western Zone, South Eastern Zone, and South Western Zone).

USAID TB CARE II Project Saves Lives of Communities in Mangochi

The Experience of Catherine Pelani
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Access to health care services among rural, resource-poor people in low-income countries remains a major obstacle to TB control efforts. A critical factor is the need to improve access to diagnostic facilities, which in many rural areas double as TB treatment initiation and registration centres for TB patients. It is common for patients to travel over 50 kilometers to access TB treatment initiation services. Thanks to the USAID TB CARE II project, more than 31, 558 people living near the Chilipa Health Centre can now access TB diagnosis and treatment close to their communities.

Catherine Pelani, 46, thanks TB CARE II for saving her life.
Catherine Pelani, 46, thanks TB CARE II for saving her life.

Reducing Delays in TB Diagnosis: Data Collection Tools to evaluate the cause and frequency of TB delays

Understanding and identifying the causes of delays in diagnosis and treatment initiation are critical to strengthening TB control programs overall. Passive case finding approaches which are prevalent in many TB programs perpetuate delays by failing both to ensure that the health system regularly captures TB suspects and also by failing to engage the population in understanding their own TB risk, and to build awareness of when and where to seek out TB services.

Country Program: 

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